A Quick Reference Guide to Photographing your own artwork

Book Cover Photographing your own artwork

I find friends and colleagues often turn to me, as a friendly photographer, when they need some advice on using the cameras or photographing subjects. 

We are all quite happy to take snapshots with the cameras in our pockets, tablets and smartphones. And most of the time, they turn out well enough for family and Facebook. It’s when we want to take the special shots that you often wish you had a bit of practical guidance.

This is particularly the case for artists who want to photograph their own artwork and put it up on the webpages or use the photographs for postcards and other material.

I find that with a few quick practical tips and advice, I can usually help the fellow artist who’s come to me with a question. Since these often are the same problems and situations, I decided to create photographing your own artwork: a quick reference guide.

This guide is for those with little or no prior photography or photo-editing experience. It makes no judgement on the type of camera that you use. Your art is your main activity and you want to be able to take your own competent photos of that work.

Buy "Photographing your own artwork: A simple guide for artists on how to photograph 2D, 3D and reflective artwork"

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B06XGD4ZR7 for only £2.50

 

From a practical point of view, the guide looks at three different types of artwork:

  • 2D, such as paintings, collages and canvases
  • 3D, such as pottery, sculptures and other dimensional work
  • Reflective artwork, such as objects made of out of polished metal, opaque glass and jewellery

Nowadays, with access to digital cameras and PCs to tablets, there are actually two stages to photography. The first is taking the best photograph that you can. The second is then editing and processing that image using photo editing software to create the best image.

What I thought would be really useful, would be a one page picture instructions that you can take with you on your kindle, smartphone or tablet for immediate reference 

I’ve created three sheets as part of the quick reference guide, for 2D, 3D and reflected artwork. The rest of the guide explains the where’s and why fors of the tips in more practical detail.

The photography checklist gives you tips on:

  • Best lighting
  • Camera stability
  • Camera settings to use
  • Framing your subject
  • Taking the photo

The photo editing checklist gives you tips on

  • Straightening and cropping an image
  • Adjusting contrast
  • Adjusting saturation
  • Sharpening the image
  • Resizing for the web

The main content following the three checklists gives you an explanation for each of the points. I’ve made every effort to keep the language simple non-technical.

Your art is your main activity and you want to be able to take your own competent photos of that work.

This is a guide for those with little or no prior photography or photo-editing experience. It makes no judgement on the type of camera that you use. Whilst most people will use a digital camera, most of the principles will apply to photos taken with a film camera and transferred to a CD or DVD.

You should be able to get good pictures of the majority of artwork by following these guides and learning about the basic photography and photo-editing steps.

Click on the link below to purchase this practical, user friendly, Quick Reference Guide, specifically for photographing your own artwork.

Buy "Photographing your own artwork: A simple guide for artists on how to photograph 2D, 3D and reflective artwork"

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B06XGD4ZR7 for only £2.50